From legalizing medical marijuana to raising taxes for schools, Utah voters will have a lot of decisions to make in November

From legalizing medical marijuana to raising taxes for schools, Utah voters will have a lot of decisions to make in November

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(Rick Bowmer | AP Photo) In this June 26, 2017, file photo, Doug Rice, right, and his daughter Ashley, left, look on with other patients, caregivers and supporters during the Utah Patients Coalition news conference at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Medical marijuana backers are moving forward with a ballot initiative to ask Utah voters directly to pass a broad medical marijuana law next year. The Utah Patients Coalition got state approval Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, to start collecting the 113,143 voter signatures for the ballot initiative in November 2018. Doug Rice, right, and his daughter Ashley, left, look on with other patients, caregivers and supporters during the Utah Patients Coalition news conference at the Utah State Capitol Monday, June 26, 2017, in Salt Lake City. A group of activists and Utah residents with chronic conditions has launched a ballot initiative to ask voters next year to pass a broad medical marijuana law. Utah voters will become legislators in the Nov. 6 general election — deciding whether to allow medical marijuana, expand Medicare, cement recent changes in how candidates qualify for the ballot, and try to stop gerrymandering. Supporters of four initiatives on those issues say they each gathered at least the 113,143 signatures needed to qualify for the ballot — and from 26 of the state’s 29 Senate districts as required — as the deadline to submit them hit Monday. The magic number of 113,143 is equal to 10 percent of the votes cast statewide in the past presidential election. Meeting the tough signature-gathering requirement will give voters the chance to weigh in on issues that polls have shown are supported by a majority of Utahns, but consistently failed to gain traction in the Legislature. One initiative fell short: the “Keep My Voice” effort by […]

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