Doctor's medical marijuana card clinic raises questions about his role on state panel

Doctor’s medical marijuana card clinic raises questions about his role on state panel

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When Michigan residents apply for a medical marijuana card, they need a doctor’s certification. At his clinic, Dr. David Crocker has signed off on thousands of applications. He also sits on a state medical marijuana panel. Sometimes Michigan’s state government relies on experts from the private sector to help guide public policy. But what if the experts stand to profit from the advice they’re giving? Take for example the panel that recommends which medical conditions allow people to qualify for medical marijuana cards. Advising the government Before the state approves a medical marijuana card, a doctor has to certify that the patient has a qualifying health condition. When the state considers new qualifying conditions, the Michigan Medical Marihuana Review Panel makes recommendations for or against them. Dr. David Crocker has served on that panel since 2012. Crocker is a radiologist by training and says he also practiced pain management and palliative care for over a decade. Crocker and his wife, Annette Crocker, who’s a registered nurse, moved to Michigan and opened a clinic just after the state’s medical marijuana law went into effect in 2008. “I feel like I’ve kind of taken a dual role here somewhat as a business person secondarily, but primarily [as] kind of an activist for the medical marijuana movement,” Crocker says. An opportunity Some doctors can’t sign off on medical marijuana applications. For example, V.A. doctors can’t because marijuana is banned under federal law. Other just don’t want to get involved. That’s where clinics like Crocker’s come in. Crocker doesn’t diagnose conditions. He reviews patients’ medical records from other doctors. If a patient has a qualifying condition, he signs off on the application. “We have about 12,000 patients scattered between our various offices,” he says. “We’ve done, probably 70 or 80,000 patient exams over […]

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Doctor's medical marijuana card clinic raises questions about his role on state panel

Doctor’s medical marijuana card clinic raises questions about his role on state panel

In Top Stories by MediReview StaffLeave a Comment

When Michigan residents apply for a medical marijuana card, they need a doctor’s certification. At his clinic, Dr. David Crocker has signed off on thousands of applications. He also sits on a state medical marijuana panel. Sometimes Michigan’s state government relies on experts from the private sector to help guide public policy. But what if the experts stand to profit from the advice they’re giving? Take for example the panel that recommends which medical conditions allow people to qualify for medical marijuana cards. Advising the government Before the state approves a medical marijuana card, a doctor has to certify that the patient has a qualifying health condition. When the state considers new qualifying conditions, the Michigan Medical Marihuana Review Panel makes recommendations for or against them. Dr. David Crocker has served on that panel since 2012. Crocker is a radiologist by training and says he also practiced pain management and palliative care for over a decade. Crocker and his wife, Annette Crocker, who’s a registered nurse, moved to Michigan and opened a clinic just after the state’s medical marijuana law went into effect in 2008. “I feel like I’ve kind of taken a dual role here somewhat as a business person secondarily, but primarily [as] kind of an activist for the medical marijuana movement,” Crocker says. An opportunity Some doctors can’t sign off on medical marijuana applications. For example, V.A. doctors can’t because marijuana is banned under federal law. Other just don’t want to get involved. That’s where clinics like Crocker’s come in. Crocker doesn’t diagnose conditions. He reviews patients’ medical records from other doctors. If a patient has a qualifying condition, he signs off on the application. “We have about 12,000 patients scattered between our various offices,” he says. “We’ve done, probably 70 or 80,000 patient exams over […]

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